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School of Business and Management Institut Teknogogi Bandung, Indonesia

I. ABEST21 Accreditation System

1. Purpose of the ABEST21 Accreditation

The mission of a business school is to nurture world-class management professionals who can compete in the age of advanced technology, social, economic, and cultural globalization, and accelerated communication. To achieve the mission, it is indispensable to develop an education system at an internationally recognized level, accompanied by educational quality assurance. Therefore, quality assurance by a third party has been requested for ensuring not only the educational quality that the school is expected to provide, but also educational quality enhancement to the stakeholders of the school.
In order to respond to these needs, ABEST21 was founded on July 1, 2005, as an accreditation institution aiming to assure not only the educational quality but also educational quality enhancement expected from the school. ABEST21 is involved in not only the quality assurance of education but in building the education system which will be the base for enhancement of education quality in response to the change of environment.
In the age of globalization, business schools are responsible for nurturing capable management professionals who can contribute to world peace and prosperity, and the quality of business education is indispensable for achieving this aim. ABEST21 as an accreditation institution has to support business schools in realizing their mission by assessing the quality of their educational and research activities in a fair and objective manner. And we have to recognize our role for supporting the establishment of education system which provides enhancement of educational quality through promotion of PDCA cycle operation toward the future.
Thus ABEST21 Quality Assurance System aims to assess the system of management education quality enhancement in response to the changes of educational and research environment, in addition to education quality assurance.
On Tuesday, March 5, 2018, ABEST21 held the Accreditation Committee and the Peer Review Committee at Shinagawa Season Terrace Conference and accredited 8 schools as follows:

A: Professional Graduate School of Business in Japan
“Management”

  • Department of Business Administration, SBI Graduate School, Japan

B: Management Accreditation in Asia
1. Program-based Accreditation System
“Master Program in Management”

  • Faculty of Economics, Universitas Andalas, Indonesia
  • Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana, Indonesia
  • Faculty of Business and Economics, Universitas Surabaya, Indonesia

“Master Program in Applied Economics”

  • Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia

“Master Program in Accounting”

  • Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia

2. Academic unit-based Accreditation System

  • School of Business and Management, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia

2. The ABEST21 Peer Review System

The ABEST21 Peer Review System consists of three components.

1) Accreditation Committee

Chair

  • Sudarso Kaderi Wiryono
    Dean, School of Business and Management, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia

Vice Chair

  • Yasunaga Wakabayashi
    Dean, Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Mohd Ridzuan Darun
    Dean, Faculty of Industrial Management, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Malaysia
  • Takeshi Hibiya
    Advisor, Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd., Japan

Members

  • Candra Fajri Ananda
    Professor, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Brawijaya, Indonesia
  • Mutsuhiro Arinobu
    Executive Director, RIKEN, Japan
  • Ilker Baybars
    Dean and CEO Emeritus, Carnegie Mellon University-Qatar
    Deputy Dean Emeritus, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
  • Ming Yu Cheng
    Professor, Faculty of Accountancy & Management, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia
  • AAhad Osman Gani
    Dean, Graduate School of Management, International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Jun Kanai
    Former President, Toshiba Human Resources Development Corporation, Japan
  • Mika Kumahira
    President, Atech Kumahira Co., Ltd., Japan
  • Katsufumi Mizuno
    Patent Attorney and President, Hikari Patent Office, Japan
  • Hisatsugu Kitajima
    General Manager, Corporate Human Resources Division
    Sony Corporate Services (Japan) Corporation, Japan
  • Tadashi Okamura
    Honorary Advisor, Toshiba Corporation, Japan
  • Robert S. Sullivan
    Dean, Rady School of Management, University of California San Diego, USA
  • Oleg Vikhanskiy
    Dean, Lomonosov Moscow State University Business School, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

2) Peer Review Committee

Chair

  • Mohd Ridzuan Darun
    Dean, Faculty of Industrial Management, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Malaysia

Vice Chair

  • Qinhai Ma
    Dean, School of Business Administration, Northeastern University, China
  • Ari Kuncoro
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Yasunaga Wakabayashi
    Dean, Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Azlan Amran
    Dean, Graduate School of Business, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

Members

  • Ir. Noer Azam Achsani
    Dean, School of Business, Institut Pertanian Bogor, Indonesia
  • Shigeru Asaba
    Dean, Graduate School of Business and Finance, Waseda University, Japan
  • Siriwut Buranapin
    Dean, Faculty of Business Administration, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
  • Yudi Azis
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia
  • Hiroshi Fujiwara
    Dean, Department of Business Administration, SBI Graduate School, Japan
  • AAhad Osman Gani
    Dean, Graduate School of Management, International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Kazuo Ichijo
    Dean, Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
  • Chiaki Iwai
    Dean, Graduate School of International Management, Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan
  • Abdul Rahman Kadir
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Hasanuddin, Indonesia
  • Ali Khatibi
    Dean, Graduate School of Management, Management & Science University, Malaysia
  • Nurkholis
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Brawijaya, Indonesia
  • Nor'Azam Mastuki
    Dean, Arshad Ayub Graduate Business School, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Vichayanan Rattanawiboonsom
    Dean, Faculty of Business, Economics and Communications, Naresuan University, Thailand
  • Arumugam Seetharaman
    Dean for Academic Affairs, S P Jain School of Global Management, Singapore
  • Zeljko Sevic
    Dean, Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Suharnomo
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia
  • Eko Suwardi
    Dean, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia
  • Sudarso Kaderi Wiryono
    Dean, School of Business and Management, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
  • Hua Xu
    Program Chair, MBA Program in International Business, Graduate School of Business
    Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Zulkornain bin Yusop
    CEO & President, Putra Business School, Malaysia
  • Mohd Zaher Mohd Zain
    Dean, Graduate School of Business, Universiti Kebangsaan, Malaysia

3) Peer Review Team

  • Dr. Agus Fredy Maradona
    Master of Management, Universitas Pendidikan Nasional, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Ali Khatibi
    Graduate School of Management, Management & Science University, Malaysia
  • Dr. Anis Chariri
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia
  • Principal Director Arfah Salleh, Ph.D.
    Human Governance Institute INC., Malaysia
  • Dean Prof. Dr. Arumugam Seetharaman
    S P Jain School of Global Management, Singapore
  • Dean Dr. Azlan Arman
    Graduate School of Business, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Prof. Dr. Badri Munir Sukoco
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia
  • Dr. Bernardinus Maria Purwanto
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia
  • Dr. Budiono
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universias Padjadjaran, Indonesia
  • Dr. Bukhshtaber Natalia
    Lomonosov Moscow State University Business School, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
  • Prof. Dr. Candra Fajri Ananda
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Brawijaya, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Christantius Dwiatmadja
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana, Indonesia
  • Dr. Danaipong Chetchotsak
    College of Graduate Study in Management, Khon Kaen University, Thailand
  • Dr. David Methé
    Institute of Business and Accounting, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
  • Prof. Dr. David Paul Elia Saerang
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Sam Ratulangi, Indonesia
  • Dr. Devika Nadarajah
    Putra Business School, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr. Dodi Wirawan Irawanto
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Brawijaya, Indonesia
  • Dean Dodie Tricahyono, Ph.D.
    School of Economics and Business, Universitas Telkom, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Eko Ganis Sukoharsono
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Brawijaya, Indonesia
  • Dr. Fathyah Hashim
    Graduate School of Business, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Prof. Dr. Gagaring Pagalung
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Hasanuddin, Indonesia
  • Dr. Gunalan Nadarajah
    Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr. Harryadin Mahardika
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia
  • Dr. Harryanto bin Nyoto
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Hasanuddin, Indonesia
  • Dr. Hen Kai Wah
    Faculty of Accountancy and Management, Universiti Tunk Abdul Rahman, Malaysia
  • Prof. Hideki Ishikawa
    Department of Business Administration, SBI Graduate School, Japan
  • Prof. Dr. Hirotaka Kawano
    Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Prof. Hiroshi Takamori, Ph.D.
    School of Accounting, LEC Graduate University, Japan
  • Prof. Dr. Huang Lin
    Graduate School of Business Administration, Kobe University, Japan
  • Prof. Dr. Ibrahim Kamal Abdul Rahman
    Universiti Kuala Lumpur Business School, Universiti Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • Dr. Ida Binti MD Yasin
    Purta Business School, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr. Idqan Fahmi
    School of Business, Institut Pertanian Bogor, Indonesia
  • Dr. Irwan Trinugroho
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia
  • Dr. Irina Petrovskaya
    Lomonosov Moscow State University Business School, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
  • Dr. Jaafar Pyeman
    Arshad Ayub Graduate Business School, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Prof. Hirotaka Kawano
    Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Dr. Prof. Lizar Alfansi
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Bengkulu, Indonesia
  • Dr. Masyhuri Hamidi
    Faculty of Economics, Universitas Andalas, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Ming Yu Cheng
    Faculty of Accountancy and Management, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia
  • Dean Dr. Mohd Ridzuan Darun
    Faculty of Industrial Management, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Malaysia
  • Dr. Mohd Zaher Mohd Zain
    Graduate School of Business, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr. Nisful Laila
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia
  • Dr. Noorihsan Bin Mohamad
    Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dean Dr. Norazam Bin Mastuki
    Arshad Ayub Graduate Business School, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Dr. Noryati Ahmad
    Arshad Ayub Graduate Business School, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Dr. Pichayalak Pichayakul
    Faculty of Business Administration, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
  • Dr. Popy Rufaidah
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia
  • Dr. Putu Anom Mahadwartha
    Faculty of Business and Economics, Universitas Surabaya, Indonesia
  • Dean Prof. Dr. Qinahi Ma
    School of Business Administration, Northeastern University, China
  • Dr. Rapeeporn Srijumpa
    Graduate School of Commerce, Burapha University, Thailand
  • Dr. Remy Magnier Watanabe
    MBA Program in International Business, Graduate School of Business Sciences,
    University of Tsukuba. Japan
  • Prof. Emeritus Dr. Richard Taggart Murphy
    University of Tsukuba. Japan
  • Dr. Reza Nasution
    School of Business and Management, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
  • Dr. Sahid Susilo Nugroho
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indoensia
  • Prof. Dr. Shahizan Bin Hassan
    Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dean Dr. Sia Bee Chuan
    Faculty of Accountancy and Management, Universiti Tunk Abdul Rahman, Malaysia
  • Prof. Shigeki Sadato
    Institute of Business and Accounting, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
  • Dean Dr. Siriwut Buranapin
    Faculty of Business Administration, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
  • Dr. Siti Zahela Sahak
    Arshad Ayub Graduate Business School, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia
  • Dr. Sri Gunawan
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia
  • Dean Prof. Dr. Sudarso Kaderi Wiryono
    School of Business and Management, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
  • Dean Dr. Suharnomo
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia
  • Dr. Sujinda Chemsripong
    Faculty of Business, Economics and Communications, Naresuan University, Thailand
  • Prof. Takao Shigeta
    Department of Business Administration, SBI Graduate School, Japan
  • Prof. Dr.Takayuki Asada
    Faculty of Business Administration, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
  • Prof. Tatsuyuki Negoro
    Graduate School of Business and Finance, Waseda University, Japan
  • Dean Prof. Dr. Taufiq Marwa Rahmat
    Faculty of Economics, Universitas Sriwijaya, Indonesia
  • Dr. Tee Keng Kok
    School of Business, Monash University Malaysia Sdn. Bhd., Malaysia
  • Dr. Tengku Ezni Balqiah
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Utomo Sarjono Putro
    School of Business and Management, Institut teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Ujang Sumarwan
    School of Business, Institut Pertanian Bogor, Indonesia
  • Dean Dr. Yudi Azis
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia
  • Prof. Dr. Yutaka Kakeda
    School of Cultural and Creative Studies, Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan
  • Dr. Zabeda Bt. Abdul Hamid
    Graduate School of Management, IIUM Academy, Malaysia
  • Dean Prof. Dr. Yasunaga Wakabayashi
    Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Dr. Yasmine Nasution
    Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia

3. The ABEST21 Accreditation Process

Step A: Applying to the ABEST21 Accreditation .

  • Step A1: Application for the “ABEST21 School Membership”
    The School has to become a full-school member of ABEST21 when it applies for the ABEST21 Accreditation.
  • Step A2: Application for the “ABEST21 Accreditation Eligibility”
    When the School applies for ABEST21 Accreditation, it has to obtain a qualification for the ABEST21 Accreditation Application. The School submits the completed Accreditation Eligibility Application to the ABEST21.
  • Step A3: Submission of the “ABEST21 Accreditation Application”
    The School submits the ABEST21 Accreditation Application to the ABEST21. Upon receiving the application, the School has to prepare to submit the “Quality Improvement Plan” immediately.

Step B: Reviewing the “Quality Improvement Plan (QIP)”

The School submits its QIP. If the QIP is successful, the School will proceed to preparation of Self-Check/Self-Evaluation Report, and the unsuccessful School will resubmit the QIP.

Step C: Reviewing the “Self-Check/Self-Evaluation Report (SCR)”

The School submits its SCR. In preparing the Report, the School conducts the self-check based on the basic and detailed perspectives of the accreditation standards with the support of the advisory team.

  • Step C2: “Desk Review” and “Peer Review Visit”
    The Peer Review Committee entrusts the Peer Review Team (PRT) of the School with the review of the Self-Check/Self-Evaluation Report. The PRT conducts the Desk Review and the Peer Review Visit.
  • Step C3: Informal announcement of the Draft of the PRT Review Report
    The PRT informally announces the Draft of the PRT Review Report to the School, providing an opportunity for the School to give its comments or objections. If any objection is raised by the School, the Peer Review Team shall conduct a factual survey and coordinate the statement.
  • Step C4: Ratification by the PRT Review Report
    Based on the coordination of opinions between the School and the PRT, the PRT reports the Draft to the Peer Review Committee. The Committee reviews it and decides on the recommendation to the Accreditation Committee.
  • Step C5: Ratification of the ABEST21 Accreditation
    The Accreditation Committee shall examine the Draft Recommendation for accreditation submitted by the Peer Review Committee and deicide by vote whether to submit it to the Board of Trustees.
    Based on the recommendation of the Accreditation Committee, the Board of Trustees reviews the recommendation and finalizes the accreditation. The accreditation result is reported to the stakeholders after the ratification by the Board of Trustees.

Step D: Reviewing the Kaizen Report

  • Step D1: Submission of the Kaizen Report
    The accredited School submits the Kaizen Report for the previous school year by the end of June every year. The Report clarifies the progress achieved in resolving the Kaizen issues based on the action plans analyzed in the SCR.
  • Step D2: Reviewing the Kaizen Report
    ABEST21 will have the School’s Peer Review Team review the Kaizen Report and its correspondence with the action plan, and prepare the Kaizen Review Report. The Peer Review Committee entrusts the Peer Review Team (PRT) of the School with the review of the Kaizen Report. PRT conducts document review and peer review visit and informally announces the draft of the recommendation to the School, providing an opportunity for the School to give its comments or objections. If any objection is raised by the School, the Peer Review Team shall conduct a factual survey and coordinate the statement.
  • Step D3: Informal Announcement of the Draft of the Kaizen Review Report to the School
    The PRT submits the Kaizen Review Report to the Peer Review Committee. The Peer Review Committee examines the coordinated Draft Recommendation based on the feasibility of the action plan and the effectiveness of the quality maintenance and improvement of education. The result is reported to the stakeholders.
  • Step D4: Ratification of the Kaizen Report
    The PRT submits the Kaizen Review Report to the Peer Review Committee. The Peer Review Committee examines the coordinated Draft Recommendation based on the feasibility of the action plan and the effectiveness of the quality maintenance and improvement of education. The result is reported to the Accreditation Committee.
    Accreditation Committee shall examine the Draft Recommendation submitted by the Peer Review Committee and decide whether to submit it to the Board of Trustees. And, based on the recommendation of the Accreditation Committee, the Board of Trustees reviews the recommendation and ratifies the report. The Kaizen Review Report is reported to the stakeholders after the ratification by the Board of Trustees.

4. ABEST21 Management Accreditation Standards

revised:Mar. 08, 2017
revised:Mar. 08, 2014
revised:Feb. 22, 2012
revised:Oct. 16, 2009
established:Jul. 02, 2006

CHAPTER ONE: INTERNAL QUALITY ASSURANCE

Standard 1- Administration and Governance

Viewpoint: Any school which applies for accreditation by ABEST21 (hereinafter called “the School”) shall have an administrative system to operate the organization in an appropriate manner. Faculty meeting and other committees shall communicate well and work together to enhance the performance of the School’s educational and research activities. Building of the governance system is required.
Criterion1-1: The School must have an administrative system for its operations.
Criterion1-2: The School must maintain a good relationship between the committees which deal with the administrative matters and the faculty meeting to examine those matters.
Criterion1-3: The School must disclose the results of administrative matters examined.
Criterion1-4: The School must have an administrative body appropriate for its type, size and function as an educational and research organization.
Criterion1-5: The School must have a governance system for its administrative operation which ensures fairness and transparency.
Criterion1-6: The School must have the audit function of oversight (external evaluation system) of its educational and research activities.
Criterion1-7: The School must review its administrative operations systematically and periodically.
Criterion1-8: The School must conduct staff development for enhancement of administrative operations.

Standard 2- Self-Check/Self-Evaluation

Viewpoint: In the rapidly changing environment of education and research, systematic self-check/self-evaluation is required to spot the issues for improvement. The speed of the improvement must exceed the speed of the environmental changes.
Criterion2-1: The School must analyze the self-check/self-evaluation systematically and periodically..
Criterion2-2: The School must share the analysis of the self-check/self-evaluation systematically.
Criterion2-3: The School must use the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation for the improvement of education quality.
Criterion2-4: The School must disclose the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation to its stakeholders.

Standard 3- Improvement of Education and Research Environment

Viewpoint: The issues spotted in the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation shall be improved based on PDCA cycle. The School should clarify the issues, plan measures to solve them, develop an action plan, implement the measures, and review the results of how the educational quality was improved.
Criterion3-1: The School must operate the PDCA cycle to make improvements based on the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation.
Criterion3-2: The School must clarify systematically the issues for improvement found during the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation.
Criterion3-3: The School must develop a plan to solve the issues for improvement based on the analysis of self-check/self-evaluation.
Criterion3-4: The School must check the progress of its action plan to solve the issues.

CHAPTER TWO: MISSION STATEMENT

Standard 4- Mission Statement

Viewpoint: The School should clearly define the purpose of its establishment, the mission statement, which should state the ideal human resources to be nurtured as well as ideal expertise, skills, and competencies. The mission statement should clarify the ideal model of the human resources to be nurtured; merely stating an abstract philosophy for education or welcome message to students are not enough for a mission statement. The mission statement needs to be reviewed regularly according to a certain process to meet the changes of the educational and research environment.
Criterion4-1: The School must define its mission statement.
Criterion4-2: The School must develop its mission statement with the aim of nurturing highly skilled professionals in management who are able to meet the needs of globalization.
Criterion4-3: The School’s mission statement must be a statement that reflects the views of its stakeholders.
Criterion4-4: The School’s mission statement must be a statement which includes developing expert knowledge, fundamental knowledge and sophisticated expertise in the realm of management.
Criterion4-5: The School must publish its mission statement in brochures, such as the School code, student admission materials, syllabi, and program outlines, and post its mission and goals on the School’s website.
Criterion4-6: The School must collect information systematically to review its mission statement regularly.

Standard 5- Mission Imperatives

Viewpoint: The School’s mission statement must imply character-building of the member of the modern society as well as nurturing professionals to meet the needs of the society. Since the School is a part of its parent university as an educational and research organization, the School’s mission statement must support the mission of the university.
Criterion5-1: The School’s mission statement must meet the social demands of the age of economic, social, and cultural globalization.
Criterion5-2: The School’s mission statement must support the mission of the parent university.
Criterion5-3: The School’s mission statement must be a statement which includes developing expert knowledge, fundamental knowledge and sophisticated expertise in the realm of management.
Criterion5-4: The School’s mission statement must be a statement that indicates the support of the students’ career development.
Criterion5-5: The School’s mission statement must be a statement that indicates contribution to the development of the educational and research activities of its faculty members.

Standard 6- Financial Strategies

Viewpoint: The School needs to secure necessary funds to realize its mission statement. For this purpose both short-term and long-term financial strategies should be planned, particularly to raise external funds.
Criterion6-1: The School must have a financial basis necessary for realizing its mission statement.
Criterion6-2: The School must develop financial strategies for securing the funds necessary for realizing its mission statement.
Criterion6-3: The School must take appropriate action to secure adequate budgets necessary for realizing its mission statement.

CHAPTER THREE: EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Standard 7- Learning Goals

Viewpoint: To nurture human resources as identified in its mission statement, the School needs to set its learning goals by defining the expertise, skills and competencies to be developed through the educational programs. Learning goals shall assure the learning outcomes.
Criterion7-1: The School must define its learning goals for the educational programs, apart from the goals outlined in the course syllabus.
Criterion7-2: The School must set the learning goals according to a certain process in the organization.
Criterion7-3: The School must take into consideration the stakeholders’ opinions when setting the learning goals.
Criterion7-4: The School must clearly stipulate its learning goals in brochures such as its syllabi and publicize them to its students.
Criterion7-5: The School must review the learning goals regularly according to a certain process in the organization. Criterion7-6: The School must provide academic assistance to students in choosing the courses in line with their learning objectives in accordance with the guidelines for student assistance.
Criterion7-7: The School must build a system to enhance communication among students, faculty, and staff, and provide academic assistance to students to help them achieve their goals.

Standard 8- Curriculum Policy

“Viewpoint: The School should design its curriculum systematically to realize its learning goals. Curriculum design should be described in and regulated by the curriculum policy.
Criterion8-1: The School must define its curriculum policy.
Criterion8-2: The School must set the curriculum policy according to a certain process.
Criterion8-3: The School must set the curriculum policy taking into consideration the opinions of the stakeholders.
Criterion8-4: The School must review the curriculum policy on a regular basis as an organization.

Standard 9- Management of Curriculum

Viewpoint: The School must design its curriculum systematically following its curriculum policy. In designing the curriculum, the School should consider elements such as systematic arrangement of the basic, fundamental, specialized subjects, placement of core subjects required for specialized education, and coordination between the academic/practical subjects. The School must also make efforts to improve its curriculum to cope with the changes in the educational environment.
Criterion9-1: The School must design its curriculum according to its curriculum policy.
Criterion9-2: In designing its curriculum, the School must pay attention to combining theory and practice effectively in line with its mission statement and following the current trends in management education and research.
Criterion9-3: In designing its curriculum, the School must aim at helping students acquire expertise, advanced professional skills, advanced levels of scholarship, high ethical standards, and a broad international perspective which are necessary for management professionals.
Criterion9-4: In designing its curriculum, the School must include core courses to provide a foundation necessary for management education and research.
Criterion9-5: The School must set a process to review its curriculum systematically and update its curriculum periodically.
Criterion9-6: The School must design a system which enables its students to take related courses in other departments at the same university and at other universities, a credit transfer system with other schools, and a system to allow students to receive academic credit by completing an internship program.
Criterion9-7: The School must utilize appropriate educational methods, including case studies, site surveys, debates, discussions, and question and answer sessions between faculty members and students and / or among students.
Criterion9-8: When the School provides distance education, it must aim to maximize its educational effect by utilizing various media.
Criterion9-9: In designing the curriculum, the School must take into consideration the opinions of the stakeholders on the learning outcomes.
Criterion9-10: The School must review its curriculum regularly and systematically, based on facts including student’s course registration, completion, credits earned, academic performance, and career options.

Standard 10- Improvement of Educational Quality

Viewpoint: For the School to achieve the learning goals and assure the learning outcomes, the educational level of the curriculum needs to be maintained and improved. To realize this, the educational environment needs to be maintained, and class hours, grading criteria, etc. must be clearly stated and maintained.
Criterion10-1: The School must provide an environment and a guidance system that is conducive to learning and teaching in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-2: The School must secure adequate classroom hours necessary for completing one credit of each course in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-3: The School must design adequate time schedules and set a limit to the number of credits which students can take to assure students’ learning efficiency in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-4: The School must establish clearly defined standards for calculating grades and for evaluating the academic performance of its students, state them in its School code, and inform the students of them in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-5: The School must take measures that ensure that the completion of the program and the academic performance of students are evaluated fairly, and that grades are calculated in an objective and standardized way in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-6: The School must set a quota on the number of students registered to a course in accordance with its educational methods, the availability and condition of its facilities, and other educational considerations in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-7: The School must prepare syllabi which state its educational goals, course content, course plans, educational methods, class materials, faculty office hours, and standards for evaluating academic performance, and disclose the syllabi.
Criterion10-8: The School must review the syllabi in a systematic manner in order to maintain and improve the quality level of education.
Criterion10-9: The School must provide adequate registration guidance, learning guidance and academic and career guidance to respond to the needs of a diversified student body including foreign students, and also provide sufficient support for the students taking distance education programs in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-10: The School’s faculty members should share information about students’ course records, attendance rates for each program, total credits earned and academic grades, and develop initiatives to improve students’ learning in order to maintain the quality level of educational content.
Criterion10-11: In case of providing shortened programs, the School must ensure that the educational methods and time schedules enable the students to achieve its learning goals in order to maintain the quality level of education.

Standard 11- Diploma Policy

Viewpoint: To testify to the society that the learning outcomes are achieved, i.e. that the students have acquired the expertise, skills and competencies through the educational program, they need to fulfill the requirements for the completion of the course and be judged under the criteria that correspond to the level of achievement of the learning outcomes. Therefore a diploma policy to define the course completion judgment needs to be set.
Criterion11-1: The School must set a diploma policy to achieve the learning outcomes.
Criterion11-2: The School must define its diploma policy.
Criterion11-3: The School must set a process to establish its diploma policy in a systematic manner.
Criterion11-4: The School must take into consideration the stakeholders’ opinion in setting its diploma policy.
Criterion11-5: The School must review its diploma policy periodically.

Standard 12- Learning Outcomes’ Review

Viewpoint: Learning outcomes refer to the expertise and skills acquired by the students through the educational program. The expertise and skills should correspond to the society’s expectations. If there is any gap between the social expectations for the learning outcomes and the actual outcomes observed, improvement of the educational program is indispensable.
Criterion12-1: The School must build a system to examine the learning outcomes.
Criterion12-2: The School must examine the learning outcomes systematically and periodically.
Criterion12-3: The School must set opportunities to hear the opinions of the stakeholders including alumni regularly.
Criterion12-4: The School must review the learning goals systematically based on the results of examination on the learning outcomes.
Criterion12-5: The School must review the educational program systematically based on the results of examination on the learning outcomes.

Standard 13- Globalization of Educational Programs

Viewpoint: Globalized educational program is essential to promote educational and research environment that meets the needs of economic, social, and cultural globalization. The advancement of globalization made it possible to conduct real-time online joint classes using video conferences among different countries regardless of time and place, as well as e-learning using advanced information communication technologies. Special classes taught by invited researchers shall also contribute to globalization of the educational program.
Criterion13-1: The School must set its learning goals while taking economic, social, and cultural globalization into account.
Criterion13-2: The School must globalize its educational program such as conducting global classes using advanced information communication technology or inviting foreign researchers to give special classes.
Criterion13-3: The School must globalize its educational program by inviting foreign researchers through international exchange to give special classes.
Criterion13-4: The School must provide appropriate student support such as guidance in course registration, study and career development for various students including foreign students.

CHAPTER FOUR: STUDENTS

Standard 14- Student Profile

Viewpoint: The School should clarify the target student profile and accept the students who fit this profile.
Criterion14-1: The School must make efforts to secure students with target profiles through its selection processes.
Criterion14-2: The School must provide opportunities for the candidates to take entrance examinations in a fair and unbiased way.
Criterion14-3: The School must update its target student profile to meet the requirements of the School’s admission policy on a continuous basis.

Standard 15- Admission Policy

Viewpoint: The School should clearly stipulate its admission policy in its selection processes in order to accept the target students for its educational program. Admission policy is not a welcome message for potential students or introduction of the School. It is a basic policy for accepting students. Once the admission policy is set, the School is ready to accept the target students.
Criterion15-1: The School must set an admission policy to accept its target students in line with its mission statement.
Criterion15-2: The School must define in its admission policy the qualification for applicants and details of entrance examination.
Criterion15-3: The School must clearly articulate its admission policy and selection criteria in brochures such as student admission materials and show them to all prospective candidates.
Criterion15-4: The School must review its admission policy systematically and periodically.

Standard 16- Student Selection

Viewpoint: Clear student selection criteria and methods according to the admission policy are required for the School to accept target students. The School needs to have the ideal students to assure the learning outcomes.
Criterion16-1: The School must define the student selection criteria and methods according to its admission policy.
Criterion16-2: The School must take in the students who fit the target profile.
Criterion16-3: The School must provide fair opportunities for applicants in the selection processes.
Criterion16-4: The School must evaluate the scholastic abilities and aptitudes of candidates in a consistent and objective fashion through its selection processes.
Criterion16-5: The School must make efforts to match the actual number of student enrollment with the required enrollment through its selection processes.
Criterion16-6: The School must review its student selection criteria and methods periodically.

Standard 17- Student Support

Viewpoint: The School should have a system to provide appropriate support for students so that they can achieve their learning goals.
Criterion17-1: The School must take various measures to provide financial support to students who need it.
Criterion17-2: The School must have administrative offices which collect and process relevant information and provide consultation for the students concerning academic guidance, career development and studying abroad.
Criterion17-3: The School must establish support systems to provide academic counseling and any other support that the students require.
Criterion17-4: The School must provide appropriate academic support and lifestyle support to international students and disabled students.
Criterion17-5: The School must review the student support system systematically and periodically.

Standard 18- Student Incentive

Viewpoint: The School needs to have a system to enhance academic progression of its students who aim to achieve their learning goals. Such system shall encourage students to perform better.
Criterion18-1: The School must have a system that rewards students who achieve excellent academic results.
Criterion18-2: The School must have a system to acknowledge the social contribution of its students.
Criterion18-3: The School must have a system for providing academic support to the students who face difficulties with continuing their studies.
Criterion18-4: The School must hold orientation programs either at the time students enter the School or before the new academic year begins, to provide incentives for students to achieve high standards of academic work.
Criterion18-5: The School must review the reward system systematically and periodically.

Standard 19- Student Diversity

Viewpoint: The School needs to nurture human resources who can coexist in a diverse society where people from different cultural and social background come together, i.e. in an economically, socially and culturally globalized society. Therefore the School should take in students with various backgrounds.
Criterion19-1: The School must promote student mobility in response to the globalization of economy, society and culture.
Criterion19-2: The School must take measures to attract a diverse student body through its selection process.
Criterion19-3: The School must provide academic, financial and other support for foreign students where appropriate.
Criterion19-4: The School must have a system to send its students to foreign universities.
Criterion19-5: The School must have an administrative system to provide necessary information and counseling for students who wish to study at foreign universities.
Criterion19-6: The School must review its system for student exchange with foreign countries systematically and periodically.

CHAPTER FIVE: FACULTY

Standard 20- Faculty Structure

Viewpoint: The School should have an adequate number of faculty members required for the educational program.
Criterion20-1: The School must have a number of full-time faculty members that is adequate for its educational program.
Criterion20-2: The School must maintain a sufficient number of full-time Professors and/or Associate Professors necessary for realizing its mission statement.
Criterion20-3: The School must secure adequate number of practically qualified faculty members to realize its mission statement.
Criterion20-4: The School must ensure that the ratio of full-time and part-time faculty members in its faculty organization is appropriate for realizing its mission statement.
Criterion20-5: The School must maintain faculty diversity in terms of age, gender, and nationality in its faculty organization.

Standard 21- Faculty Qualifications

Viewpoint: The School should have faculty members not merely of sufficient number, but also of sufficient expertise and skills. The School should evaluate the qualification and performance of the faculty members appropriately, and ensure that the educational program makes full use of the faculty members’ abilities.
Criterion21-1: The School must have qualified full-time faculty members for each of the majors it offers in accordance with the following criteria:

  1. Faculty members recognized as possessing outstanding accomplishments in research or education
  2. Faculty members recognized as possessing outstanding skills in their field of study
  3. Faculty members recognized as possessing outstanding knowledge and experience in their field of study.

Criterion21-2: The School must set rules and standards for recruiting and promotion of faculty members.
Criterion21-3: The School must have a promotion system for faculty members and evaluate each faculty member fairly and objectively through this system.
Criterion21-4: The School must periodically assess its faculty members by reviewing their educational and research performance during the last five years.
Criterion21-5: The School must disclose information about the educational and research performance of full-time faculty members during the previous five years.
Criterion21-6: The School must evaluate academic performance of professional faculty members periodically, and assign the courses which they teach appropriately.

Standard 22- Maintenance of Education and Research Environment

Viewpoint: The School should have a good educational and research environment for its faculty members to enhance their teaching activities.
Criterion22-1: The School must limit the number of courses its faculty members teach so that faculty members can secure time to develop their educational and research activities.
Criterion22-2: The School must have a support system to secure the research funds necessary for promoting faculty members’ educational and research activities.
Criterion22-3: The School must have a support system including administrative and technical support staff necessary for promoting faculty members’ educational and research activities.
Criterion22-4: The School must take appropriate steps to vitalize its curricula so as to promote the educational and research activities of its faculty.
Criterion22-5: The School must set a special research period for its faculty.
Criterion22-6: The School must set a sabbatical system for its faculty.
Criterion22-7: The School must have a system to reward excellent academic research of its faculty.
Criterion22-8: The School must have a system to apply the excellent academic research results achieved by the faculty in the educational process.

Standard 23- Responsibilities of Faculty Members

Viewpoint: The School’s faculty members should strive to communicate with its stakeholders and ensure that their research and teaching activities are aimed at achieving the School’s mission statement.
Criterion23-1: The School’s faculty members must continuously develop and improve their course content, materials used in their courses, and teaching methods based on the results of the self-check/self-evaluation and the student evaluation.
Criterion23-2: The School’s faculty members must strive to teach cutting-edge expertise and specialized knowledge in their respective fields of study in order to achieve the learning goals.
Criterion23-3: The School’s faculty members must strive to set office hours and actively communicate with the students through e-mail in order to help them to achieve their learning goals.
Criterion23-4: The School must conduct faculty development to enhance their teaching abilities systematically and periodically.

Standard 24- Faculty Diversity

Viewpoint: The School needs to have a faculty coming from diverse backgrounds, in accordance to the globalization of economy, society and culture.
Criterion24-1: The School must have a faculty whose members represent various backgrounds.
Criterion24-2: The School must have an exchange program system for the faculty members.
Criterion24-3: The School must have a system to invite visiting teachers with excellent academic performance or special expertise.
Criterion24-4: The School must review its system for faculty members’ international exchange systematically and periodically.

CHAPTER SIX:EDUCATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Standard 25- Educational Infrastructure

Viewpoint: The School needs to have modern facilities for educational and research. Apart from ordinary classrooms and seminar rooms, facilities such as students’ study rooms, computer rooms, photocopy rooms and joint research rooms are necessary. A library that provides access to the academic journals and audio-visual materials is also necessary.
Criterion25-1: The School must maintain an appropriate number and quality of its facilities, such as classrooms, seminar rooms, and study rooms, in order to enhance the efficiency of its educational programs.
Criterion25-2: The School must provide an individual office for each full-time faculty member.
Criterion25-3: The School must have a joint research room for the faculty.
Criterion25-4: The School must systematically maintain a collection of books, academic journals, and audiovisual materials necessary for the educational and research activities of both students and faculty.
Criterion25-5: The School must effectively utilize and maintain facilities and equipment appropriate for its educational and research activities and the delivery of its educational programs.
Criterion25-6: The School must provide study environment that enables students to engage in self-study, and encourage students to make use of this environment.
Criterion25-7: The School must review its facilities systematically and periodically.

Standard 26- Globalization of Educational Infrastructure

Viewpoint: To meet the needs of the society where economic, social, cultural globalization is developing, the School needs to be able to conduct joint classes with foreign schools using online real-time video conference and other advanced information communication methods.
Criterion26-1: The School must prepare appropriate facilities for students with different cultural backgrounds.
Criterion26-2: The School must prepare appropriate accommodation for students with different cultural backgrounds.
Criterion26-3: The School must prepare appropriate religious facility for students with different cultural backgrounds.

II. The Peer Review Team Comprehensive Evaluation

1. PRT Quality Assurance Evaluation

1) The School’s Mission Statement

The SBM ITB mission statement is:
“To educate students to be innovative leaders with an entrepreneurial mindset and to develop and disseminate knowledge of business and management for the betterment of business, government, and society”.
SBM ITB is mission driven. It has strong engagements both internally (students and faculty) and externally with other stakeholders. The mission itself is innovative with respect to continuously developing “innovative leaders with an entrepreneurial mindset” and the School constantly reviews its activities to make innovative improvements. The mission targets the “betterment of business, government, and society”. The School thus aims to make an impact on the development and future prospects of Indonesia and the world; it also implies that high proportion of faculty research should produce intellectual contributions that can be applied to make a positive impact . Thus SBM ITB’s mission and its implementation in educational and research activities strongly reflects humanization, globalization, and industry collaboration.

2) The School’s Educational System

SBM ITB develops its learning goals and objectives based on the School’s mission, expected outcomes and strategies. The key elements of the School’s mission – which are innovative leaders, entrepreneurial mindset, knowledge, and the betterment of business, government, and society – are translated into key learning goals for each degree program. Learning goals are developed by the Assurance of Learning (AoL) and Curriculum Development Team together with all faculty members.
Since 2014, the Assurance of Learning and Curriculum Development Team and faculty members have undertaken an extensive program of curriculum mapping to match the program content with explicit learning goals. Curricula management processes are guided by SBM ITB’s mission, expected outcomes and strategies. The team develops AoL system, learning goals and learning objectives for each degree program, curricula alignment, rubric to evaluate students’ success at achieving learning goals, assessment instrument and measurement, improvement plan, as well as provides feedback and guidance. AoL and Curricula Development Team works closely with Degree Program Director (Program director), and CLT (Comittee of Learning and Teaching) and is monitored by the Vice Dean for Academic affairs. The systematic AoL process is shown in Figure 1.

Currently, AoL and Curricula Development Team has developed assessment plans to assess whether students are meeting the learning goals or not. The assessment is designed for degree program level on a rolling yearly basis. Each AoL cycle consists of assessment on odd semester, even semester and short semester with a focus on several courses per semester that reflects learning goals and learning objectives. The School has started the pilot assessment on the odd semester (August 2015). This process would produce a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate whether students meet the learning goals or not. If assessment shows evidence that students are not meeting the learning goals, the School will institute efforts to eliminate the discrepancy. Currently, SBM ITB is in the closing the loop exercise stage and continuing the AoL assessment process for the remaining courses that have not been measured yet. Measurements of assessment include:

  • Direct assessment. SBM ITB has developed direct measurements to evaluate student achievement by using rubrics to assess the level of learning on the part of the students and delivery made by faculty members. The rubric uses a three-point assessment scale: poor, satisfactory, and excellent. Additionally, there are course-embedded assessments as follows:
    - Student project
    - Exams or embedded questions on exams
    - Final project
    - Research paper
    - Presentation
    - Case analysis.
  • Indirect assessment. SBM ITB has developed a tracer study (survey) to keep record of the alumni status. This study assesses the availability and quality of the alumni in order to get feedback for curricula improvement. The tracer study includes interviews and focus group discussions with companies employing SBM ITB alumni in order to get feedback from them. Besides the tracer study, MBA program utilizes behavioral assessment to help assess the learning level of new intakes of students as well as graduating students.

Learning Goals and Learning Objectives of each degree program are expected to be achieved through its curriculum. Further, the content of degree program curricula that results from effective curricula management processes includes generally accepted sets of learning experiences to prepare graduates for business and management careers. Curricula management process results in curricula that address the broadly defined skills and knowledge areas. The School translates these general areas into expected competencies or general skills and knowledge that are embedded in curricula documents and in line with degree program learning goals.

3) The School’s Educational Degree Programs

SBM ITB offers two degree programs for the undergraduate level and three degree programs for the graduate level:

  1. Bachelor of Management Program, established in December 2003
  2. Bachelor of Entrepreneurship Program, established in August 2013
  3. Master of Business Administration Program, established in 1990 and absorbed into SBM ITB in December 2003
  4. Master of Science in Management Program, established in February 2007
  5. Doctor of Science in Management Program, established in August 2008.

Regulation of the Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture (Regulation number 49/2014) states that an undergraduate program has a minimum total of 144 credits, master program has a minimum total of 36 credits, and doctoral program has a minimum total of 72 credits. This regulation defines one semester-credit (SKS) that is equal to 50 minutes of face-to-face lecture, 50 minutes of structured learning, and 60 minutes of independent learning per week per semester.

Bachelor of Management, located at Bandung Campus

A major aspect that distinguishes this program from other business or management programs in Indonesia is the unique learning process combining business knowledge and skills with ethics and major soft skills, including innovation and leadership. Since its establishment, ITB has promoted basic science and engineering as the focus of learning. In 2003, SBM ITB was established as the only faculty in ITB in the area of humanities and management science.
The first year curriculum is designed to encourage students to be open-minded and have a wider spectrum of thinking in the context of diverse world community. In the second year, the program focuses on more technical components of management. Students integrate their knowledge with real business experience in a course named Integrative Business Experience (IBE). In the third and final year, students take elective courses in line with their future career plans and their concentration or interest. These areas of interest include finance, marketing, operations, and human resources. Real experience in the first two years will help the students to sharpen their specific abilities.

Bachelor of Entrepreneurship, located at Jatinangor Campus

In accordance with SBM’s spirit, as reflected in all the programs, the Bachelor of Entrepreneurship includes emphasis on developing students’ soft skills. This program highlights the process of building start-up business by implementing students' skills and knowledge gained throughout the learning process. It starts from identifying market opportunities, searching for creative ideas, developing business plan and starting innovative businesses with a measurable risk. The purpose of this program is to create entrepreneurs who will bring multiplier effect to the economy.

Master of Business and Administration, located at Bandung Campus and Jakarta Campus

MBA Programs within SBM ITB are divided into two main concentrations, each serving a specific purpose. The first concentration, Executive MBA, aims to accelerate students’ managerial skills in different stages of their career. To enhance the international exposure, in 2012 SBM ITB opened a new dual degree MBA program called Global Leadership Executive MBA (GLEMBA) in cooperation with Aalto School of Economics, Finland. The second concentration, MBA Young Professional and MBA Entrepreneurship, target fresh and recent graduates and aim to prepare students prior to entering job market or starting their business as an entrepreneur. MBA Young Professional equips students with sufficient managerial skills in order to enhance their early stage of career. MBA Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship, in cooperation with Goldsmiths University of London, focuses on initiating a start-up business or expanding an existent business. In 2009, MBA program was acknowledged by SWA magazine (National Business Magazine) as the best MBA in Indonesia. MBA was internationally accredited by ABEST21 (The Alliance on Business Education and Scholarship for Tomorrow) in 2013.

Master of Science in Management, located at Ganesha Campus, Bandung

This program focuses on preparing students to conduct research in the discipline of management. This program is also designed to produce managers with a solid foundation in the scientific concepts of management. Every year, MSM students produce research publications in their specialization. Since 2009, this program has also been offered as a Double Master degree program in collaboration with Tokyo University of Science (TUS), Japan.

Doctor of Science in Management, located at Bandung Campus and Jakarta Campus

This program aims to foster expertise in research that contributes to the development of management science in general. To reach this aim, DSM students are expected to master fundamental knowledge of management science and become familiar with relevant analytical tools in such topics as economics, human resources and organizational behavior, mathematics, and statistics. They are also expected to have ability in problem solving, theory or model development, and addressing managerial implications resulting from their research. DSM also offers a double doctoral degree program in collaboration with Tokyo University of Science (TUS), Japan.

4) The School’s Scope of Accreditation

Academic Unit-based Accreditation System: School of Business and Management

5) The Peer Review Team

Leader Dean Dr. Suharnomo
Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia
Member Dr. Harryadin Mahardika
Director-MM programs, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Indonesia
Member Prof. Dr. Badri Munir Sukoco
Faculty of Economics and Business, Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia
Member Dean Dr. Mohd Ridzuan Darun
Faculty of Industrial Management, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Malaysia
Member Prof. Dr. Hirotaka Kawano
Graduate School of Management, Kyoto University, Japan
Member Dean Dr. Azlan Arman
Graduate School of Business, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

6) The Peer Review Schedule

Process Committee Date
Ratification of the Quality Improvement Plan Peer Review Committee Nov. 9-10, 2016
Implementation of the Peer Review Visit Peer Review Team Oct. 23, 2017
Ratification of the Self-Evaluation Report Peer Review Committee Nov. 25-26, 2017
Ratification of the PRT Review Report Peer Review Committee Mar. 5, 2018
Recommendation of the ABEST21 Accreditation Accreditation Committee Mar. 5, 2018
Ratification of the ABEST21 Accreditation Board of Trustee Mar. 6, 2018

7) The ABEST21 Peer Review Result
(1) Comprehensive Review

“ABEST21 certifies that the School’s educational and research activities satisfy all or most accreditation standards. The School’s KAIZEN plans are excellent, and quality maintenance and improvement of education and research are very promising and excellent.”

  1. Bachelor Programs:
    Overall, Bachelor program at SBM ITB is an excellent program, and there are no major issues to be highlighted. The quality improvement system is clearly working, the 3-year plan is systematic, and the PRT concludes that the program has all the potential to become the global player.
  2. Master’s Programs
    The School’s efforts to increase the quality of education are very good. However, PRT has a concern that globalization is too much emphasized, given the fact that the number of foreign students is not high. Localization may be also very important, especially for entrepreneurship development.
    The revised document has answered some of the PRT’s feedback. We also see a better alignment between issues, strategies and action plans. However, we suggest that the School makes an additional minor revision on the following areas:
    ・LG and LO map
    ・Sustainability of new sources of revenue
    ・Standardization across campuses
    ・Strategies for globalization
  3. Doctoral Program:
    No Comment.

(2) The Period of Quality Assurance

Accreditation commences April 1, 2018 for a five-year period. After the accreditation, the School must implement the yearly plan according to its action plan, and respond to the expectations of the social stakeholders. Therefore, the School is required to submit the progress report (KAIZEN Report) by the end of June at the 3rd year after being accredited.

2. Good Practice in Management Education

“Entrepreneurship Leadership Program”

3. Matters to be noted

Bachelor programs:

  1. The School’s efforts in enhancing the quality are commendable, but the concern is that globalization is too much emphasized, while the number of foreign students is not high. The School needs to address this issue.

Master’s programs:

  1. The global and domestic market for postgraduate management education is changing due to globalization of business and student population. There is a need for new approaches to management and leadership. The changing expectations of students need to be addressed.
  2. Given the new requirements of firms and organizations, the School needs to review the content and structure of the MBA and related award programs to meet the needs of the stakeholders and develop a differentiated product.

Doctoral program:

  1. Data on facilities’ utilization shows high level of utilization, but in the SWOT analysis low maintenance is stated as one of the weaknesses. Therefore, SBM ITB needs to make sure that the current facilities are maintained in the future. The report shows that the appropriate initiatives are not developed yet.

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